Kurdish women in beautiful traditional clothes celebrating. Not all Middle Eastern women cover up with hijab or the chador or the burkah. 
EDIT- Ok, first of all, i am NOT white. Please do not swear or accuse me of things when you do not know the facts. Just because i do not throw my ethnicity all over this blog does not mean that I do not have “epistemic privilege”. I am, in fact, KURDISH. Therefore, I know EXACTLY what I am talking about in THIS instance. The emphasis of the post was not so much on the traditional clothes, (PLEASE NOTE THE SECOND LINE IN THE FIRST POST ABOVE) as I am WELL aware of the fact that other women and cultures within the Middle East and North African region (MENA) wear a multitude of different garments, which are incredibly diverse and colourful. The emphasis was on the FREEDOM to wear what you want without the imposition of the veil in its many forms. The word ‘Burkah’ was used, (along with the word hijab and chador) as it is the simplest way most people, who do know much about the region, understand the multitude of different forms of covering that women in the MENA region wear. Please do not selectively read into my post to help your own personal agenda. Further, Afghanistan IS part of the MENA region, and yes that includes the Middle East. Moreover, many other groups and communities in the UAE and the GULF region, as well as in Syria, Iraq, Iran, Pakistan, Egypt and in parts of Isreal wear the burkah- which is a covering of various colours (usually blue or black) that only allows for the eyes to be seen. Caadi Iska Dhig you mentioned that other women such as in Oman or Suadi Arabia also wear traditional garments. However, ALL of these women MUST cover up by wearing the hijab, burkah, khimar, Niqab etc, if they are in PUBLIC. MANY Kurdish women have the choice of not wearing the hijab/burkah/niqab/etc IN public. I would be very interested if you could enlighten me as to whether women in Oman are able to do so in public. As far as I am aware they are not as the state is ruled under Sharia Law. The only location I am a 100% not certain of is the Palestinian territories, though I do know that the women wear a variety of different forms of the veil.  I know in Egypt women have a choice as well. Yes, many women in the MENA region choose to wear the veil in a variety of forms (aside from the existence of Sharia Law which imposes the veil in public), but there are also many women who given the CHOICE will not. And yes, MANY Kurdish women DO wear the hijab/burkah/niqab but MANY ALSO DO NOT! Since I am a Kurd, and have lived in various parts of the Middle East I know that many do not wear the hijab, nor have ANY desire to wear it. I have recently returned from there, and there were women wearing the veil and there were women in t-shirt and jeans or short skirts. YES, i dislike the veil in all its various forms, this is my opinion. Other women should have the choice if they want to wear the veil or not. I was merely trying to show a different side to the MENA region that most people do not see. Thank you for stopping by the page. Have a lovely day. 
Dec 16, 2013 / 54 notes

Kurdish women in beautiful traditional clothes celebrating. Not all Middle Eastern women cover up with hijab or the chador or the burkah. 

EDIT- Ok, first of all, i am NOT white. Please do not swear or accuse me of things when you do not know the facts. Just because i do not throw my ethnicity all over this blog does not mean that I do not have “epistemic privilege”. I am, in fact, KURDISH. Therefore, I know EXACTLY what I am talking about in THIS instance. The emphasis of the post was not so much on the traditional clothes, (PLEASE NOTE THE SECOND LINE IN THE FIRST POST ABOVE) as I am WELL aware of the fact that other women and cultures within the Middle East and North African region (MENA) wear a multitude of different garments, which are incredibly diverse and colourful. The emphasis was on the FREEDOM to wear what you want without the imposition of the veil in its many forms. The word ‘Burkah’ was used, (along with the word hijab and chador) as it is the simplest way most people, who do know much about the region, understand the multitude of different forms of covering that women in the MENA region wear. Please do not selectively read into my post to help your own personal agenda. Further, Afghanistan IS part of the MENA region, and yes that includes the Middle East. Moreover, many other groups and communities in the UAE and the GULF region, as well as in Syria, Iraq, Iran, Pakistan, Egypt and in parts of Isreal wear the burkah- which is a covering of various colours (usually blue or black) that only allows for the eyes to be seen. Caadi Iska Dhig you mentioned that other women such as in Oman or Suadi Arabia also wear traditional garments. However, ALL of these women MUST cover up by wearing the hijab, burkah, khimar, Niqab etc, if they are in PUBLIC. MANY Kurdish women have the choice of not wearing the hijab/burkah/niqab/etc IN public. I would be very interested if you could enlighten me as to whether women in Oman are able to do so in public. As far as I am aware they are not as the state is ruled under Sharia Law. The only location I am a 100% not certain of is the Palestinian territories, though I do know that the women wear a variety of different forms of the veil.  I know in Egypt women have a choice as well. Yes, many women in the MENA region choose to wear the veil in a variety of forms (aside from the existence of Sharia Law which imposes the veil in public), but there are also many women who given the CHOICE will not. And yes, MANY Kurdish women DO wear the hijab/burkah/niqab but MANY ALSO DO NOT! Since I am a Kurd, and have lived in various parts of the Middle East I know that many do not wear the hijab, nor have ANY desire to wear it. I have recently returned from there, and there were women wearing the veil and there were women in t-shirt and jeans or short skirts. YES, i dislike the veil in all its various forms, this is my opinion. Other women should have the choice if they want to wear the veil or not. I was merely trying to show a different side to the MENA region that most people do not see. Thank you for stopping by the page. Have a lovely day. 

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  13. wanaagsan reblogged this from chasing-rose and added:
    umm you do understand that different middle eastern communities all have their own traditional clothing. Omani Saudi...
  14. imminentrevolt reblogged this from dolmaenthusiast
  15. dolmaenthusiast reblogged this from chasing-rose and added:
    let’s start a petition to stop white feminists from voicing their irrelevant opinions on the middle east
  16. chasing-rose reblogged this from the-feminist-monologue and added:
    Ugh no white feminists.Kurdish women DO CHOOSE to wear the hijab, Kurdish women DO CHOOSE to wear something similar to...
  17. wejdanjaber reblogged this from the-feminist-monologue
  18. jayeon reblogged this from kchikurdi and added:
    Most of their posts are just reposted graphics too. No credit given.
  19. kchikurdi reblogged this from the-feminist-monologue and added:
    get the fuck outta here with your sexist white feminism that FEMEN mentalityget the fuck out you piece of shit oh my god
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